Jordan

100 Water Heroes: Queen Rania Al Abdullah

Queen Rania Al Abdullah is the queen consort of Jordan and is known for her humanitarian focus and for using her platform to advocate for women’s right and issues of sustainability. In 1995, she founded the Jordan River Foundation, which seeks to “boost employment and conservation through eco-tourism projects.”

One of her most significant contributions to environmental sustainability in Jordan was the creation of the Arab Sustainability Leadership Group. The results of their first serious project were released in 2009 in the Responsible Competitiveness in the Arab World report, highlighting what companies can do to secure financial success, as well as operating in transparent, environmentally sustainable ways. In the introduction of the report, Queen Rania stated:

"A new architecture for a sustainable global economy must be designed now; it must guide new business practices today"

In addition to her work with the Arab Sustainability Leadership Group, Queen Rania has supported local farmers and encouraged organic farming practices, hoping to “provide health, environmental, and economic benefits while also helping to address the serious water shortages in the region” (Hattam, 2009).

Queen Rania is one of our #100WaterHeroes for her humanitarian and environmental initiatives, and for using her platform to uplift and empower the local community.

Twitter: @QueenRania

Facebook: @QueenRania

Instagram: @queenrania

100 Water Heroes: Lana Mazahreh

c6c0d3b60a41925ed8b8ec581fb57d20cff9c6f8_254x191.jpg

Conservation Program Developer at WWF Regional Office for Africa

Lana Mazahreh is the Conservation Program Developer at WWF Regional Office for Africa, where they seek to “provide innovative solutions to conserve species and their habitats and maintain key ecological services.” Prior to her work with WWF, Lana has been immersed in projects related to the environment, economic development, employment, education and social care.

Lana grew up in Jordan, where she experienced complete water scarcity first-hand, and had to adopt innovative solutions to conserving water from an early age. Her involvement in water-saving projects has continued with as she worked closely with the World Wide Fund for Nature on South Africa’s water crisis.

Lana holds an MBA degree from INSEAD Business School, as well as a BSc Degree in Business Information Systems. She is well-known for her TED talk entitled 3 Thoughtful Ways to Conserve Water, in which she reflects on what we can learn from water-scarce countries who are dealing with what is soon becoming a global issue.

Reflecting on her childhood in water-poor Jordan, Lana notes:

I grew up in Jordan, a water-poor country that has experienced absolute water scarcity since 1973. And still, in 2017, only 10 countries in the world have less water than Jordan. So dealing with a lack of water is quite ingrained in my soul. As soon as I was old enough to learn how to write my name, I also learned that I need to conserve water. My parents would constantly remind my siblings and I to close the tap when we brushed our teeth. We used to fill balloons with flour instead of water when we played.

Lana is one of our #100WaterHeroes for reminding us that we can all make small, water-saving changes to ensure that every drop counts.

Twitter: @MazahrehLana

Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/lana-mazahreh-لانا-مزاهره-78154919

100 Water Heroes: Benjamin Smith

RArnold_Jordan2014_UNICEF_MG_1582.jpg

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Specialist

Benjamin Smith is Project Manager of the UNICEF WASH facility in Za’atari, a refugee camp with a population of almost 80 000 people. In addition to being a WASH specialist, Benjamin holds a Masters in Civil and Environmental Engineering, and has professional experience in the fields of water and wastewater engineering, construction and project management.

Benjamin’s involvement in the Za’atari camp sees him work with both clients and contractors, leading teams in the conception and development waste and wastewater projects.

UNICEF’s support of refugee camps in Jordan has involved the provision of well-rounded WASH services, and reaches more than 100 000 refugees throughout the ares. In Za’atari refugee camp specifically, UNICEF has developed a range of WASH initiatives “to reduce cost, sustain services, and mitigate the environmental impact of the interventions.” For instance, they have drilled boreholes to lessen public reliance on external tankering, and have also built a number of mobile waste-water treatment units. WASH committees have also been put together, made up largely of Syrian refugees who “assume the responsibility for the operation and maintenance of communal WASH blocks, thereby reducing monitoring and maintenance costs.”

Benjamin is one of our #100WaterHeroes for his leadership of UNICEF’s impactful WASH initiatives in Jordan’s Za’atari refugee camp.

Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/benjamin-smith-573ab010